SOPhiA 2018

Salzburgiense Concilium Omnibus Philosophis Analyticis

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Programme - Talk

Naturalizing the Mind: Intrinsic Nature, Misplaced Concreteness and where the Russelian Monist Goes Wrong
(Philosophy of Mind, English)

In an attempt to produce an account of how consciousness fits within the causally closed physical world, the Russelian Monist relies on Russell's argument for intrinsic natures and Whitehead's fallacy of misplaced concreteness, to argue against the structuralism of physics and towards the claim that consciousness constitutes the intrinsic nature of matter. However, she fails to produce such an account. In my presentation I enquire whether the Russelian Monist fails in virtue of relying on Russell and Whitehead's arguments or, conversely, whether a more adequate analysis of Russell and Whitehead's positions can provide us with some valuable suggestion as to how to naturalize the mind. I distill two main points common to both arguments: (i) a neutral approach to the ''stuff'' of the world and (ii) and event based ontology. I argue that these are the most valuable contribution that Russell's argument and Whitehead's fallacy provide us with and that the Russelian monist fails in virtue of leaving these features out of her account.

Chair: Katsiaryna Suryna
Time: 10:40-11:10, 13 September 2018 (Thursday)
Location: SR 1.003

Marta Santuccio 
(Central European University, Hungary)

I am a PhD candidate at Central European University in Budapest. My curiosity for the Universe and consciousness is the driving force of my work, as well as an interest of mine from an early age. In my research I aim to develop a process based account of consciousness, that overcomes the problems generally associated with more traditional views, in the hope of pushing the consciousness debate forward. Before deciding to pursue philosophy more rigorously in an academic environment and hence taking the MLitt at the University of Glasgow, I focused on studying consciousness from a more practical perspective. I obtained a Masters in Art and Science at Central Saint Martins in London. My practice focused on the creation of immersive environments aimed at creating spaces for visitors to experience various states of consciousness through perception. I continue to make art and my philosophical work feeds strongly on the more practical aspect of my research.

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