SOPhiA 2021

Salzburgiense Concilium Omnibus Philosophis Analyticis

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Programme - Talk

When do we attribute mental states to others and to oneself adequately?
(Philosophy of Mind, )

A The aim of my presentation is to undertake the issue of mental states attribution and the main focus will be taken on the criteria of their adequate ascription. There will be considered the capability for simulating others' mental state - putting oneself in someone's shoes - which is important but at the same time, not sufficient for the adequacy of mental states ascription. There will be also reflected similarities between interacting people - they may contribute to understanding one another, but they may also impede this process. However, the abilities for differentiating perspectives and separating one's own and other's mental states seem to be necessary conditions for an adequate mentalization. The ability of differentiating the agency of mental states is the essential element for social cognition. It is also important to understand that particular mental states may be shared with others, but not all the time. There will be considered results on the development of the ability of differentiating perspectives and disorders of this ability in borderline personality disorder. The ability of differentiating oneself and others' mental states will be presented as the aspect of social cognition that enable adequate mentalization, due to accepting the presence of various perspectives and the possibility of the coexistence of various representations of reality. This ability enables adequate mentalization as a result of considering various perspectives and recognizing the possibility of the coexistence of various representations of reality. Probably it is not the only aspect of social cognition enabling adequate mental states ascription but it seems to be an essential one.

Chair: Daniel Weger
Time: 10:40-11:10, 10 September 2021 (Friday)
Location: SR 1.005

Adrianna Smurzynska  
(Jagiellonian University, )



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